Columbus and the Age of Discovery, in muweb.millersv.edu/~columbus/ a website run by Professor Tirado at Millersville University, leads to more than a thousand print and online sources. Some authors have argued that Isabella`s call to holiness is largely the result of an image carefully crafted and disseminated by the Queen herself. [107] The parchment copy of the Book of Privileges of the Library is one of four that Columbus, in 1502, commissioned to retain his agreements with the Spanish crown. It is unique in the preservation of an unofficial transcription of a papal bull of September 26, 1493, in which Pope Alexander VI extended the rights of Spain to the New World. On December 11, 1474, after Henry`s death, Isabella acceded on the same day to the throne of Queen of Castile and León. Ferdinand served as co-monarch, king of Castile and León. There have already been many plots against her after being appointed to succeed her brother. Diego Pacheco, Marquis of Villena and his followers firmly believed that Isabella had no place on the throne and that Henry`s daughter, Joanna, was the legitimate queen. The Archbishop of Toledo, who has always supported Isabella, left the court to meet the Marquis after making his claim known. They planned to marry their uncle for Infantine Johanna, King Alfons V of Portugal, so that they could claim the throne by invading Castile.

Alfonso and Joanna married in May 1475 and began the war between Spain and Portugal. The legal documents presented here present an agreement that if Christopher Columbus or Christbal Colon, as he was called, successfully found a new path to the riches he believed to be west of the European continent, he would be well rewarded. In April 1492, Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain agreed that Columbus should be appointed admiral, be able to assume responsibility for the newly opened lands and thus exploit any potential trade. In addition, a tenth part of the wealth that Christopher Columbus found there could flow into his own pocket. These documents show that Columbus was not only an explorer, but a man interested in enjoying the benefits of trade and exploiting the natural resources of the lands he would claim for Spain. . . .